The Campaign to End Obesity

Today, two-thirds of U.S. adults and nearly one in three children struggle because they are overweight or have obesity. The effects of the nation’s obesity epidemic are immense: taxpayers, businesses, communities and individuals spend hundreds of billions of dollars each year due to obesity, including nearly $200 billion in medical costs. Obesity is the reason that the current generation of youth is predicted to live a shorter life than their parents. 

Much can be done to reverse the epidemic, yet important opportunities to tackle obesity at the national policy level -- including changes that enable more Americans to eat healthy and be active, as well as those that provide appropriate medical treatment for patients -- have gone largely unmet. The Campaign works to fill this gap. By bringing together leaders from across industry, academia and public health with policymakers and their advisors, the Campaign provides the information and guidance that decision-makers need to make policy changes that will reverse one of the nation’s costliest and most prevalent diseases.


The Campaign to End Obesity
It’s gotten harder to lose weight and not for the reasons you think
The Washington Post, 10.01.15
Losing weight is hard — and it’s getting harder. That’s not an excuse, a group of researchers say, it’s science. A study from York University published recently in the journal Obesity Research & Clinical Practice looked at dietary and exercise data for tens of thousands of Americans over the past four decades and found an unsettling but perhaps not so surprising trend: Even when he had the same diet and same activity level, a given adult in 2006 had a higher BMI than a counterpart of the same age in 1988.
With Increasing Obesity, Children's Heart And Diabetes Risks Rise
Forbes, 09.30.15
The number of adults in the U.S. who are overweight or obese—more than two-thirds—has become worrisome enough. But the number of overweight and obese kids, though less than that of adults, is also growing, and especially troubling since the signs of heart disease and diabetes can follow from eerily early in childhood. A couple of weeks ago, the case study of the youngest person ever to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes—at three years old—was presented at a diabetes conference in Europe. A new study in The New England Journal of Medicine lays out what happens in the body when kids are not just overweight, but various levels of obese. And extreme obesity seems to pose considerably more risks than mild obesity.
The Price We Pay for Sitting Too Much
The Wall Street Journal, 09.30.15
New research is helping medical experts devise formulas for how long a typical office worker should spend sitting and standing. Studies have found that sedentary behavior, including sitting for extended periods, increases the risk for developing dozens of chronic conditions, from cancer and diabetes to cardiovascular disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Some ergonomics experts warn that too much standing also can have negative effects on health, including greater risk for varicose veins, back and foot problems, and carotid artery disease. “The key is breaking up your activity throughout the day,” said Alan Hedge, a professor of ergonomics at Cornell University. “Sitting all day and standing all day are both bad for you.”
More news

New Release: The New Markets Tax Credit: Opportunities for Investment
in Healthy Foods and Physical Activity

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CBO Scoring Misses Billions of Dollars in Potential Long-Term Savings from Effective Obesity Prevention Policies

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Read More

To learn more about changes in federal policy that will enable more Americans to eat healthy and be active, as well as those that provide appropriate medical treatment for patients, visit the Campaign to End Obesity Action Fund's website by clicking here.  

* In 2010, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office reported that nearly 20 percent of the increase in U.S. health care spending (from 1987‐2007) was caused by obesity.

* The annual health costs related to obesity in the U.S. are nearly $200 billion, and nearly 21 percent of U.S. medical costs can be attributed on obesity, according to research released by the National Bureau of Economic Research.

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